What if a college education just isn't for everyone- Then what?

Posted 6/7/2010 11:31 AM by Maisha Meminger

March 16, 2010 USA Today article asks : "What if college isn't for everyone?"

Marklein reports, "Long before President Obama vowed last year that America will 'have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world' by 2020, the premium placed on going to college was firmly embedded in the American psyche. ... And yet, there's an undercurrent of concern about a group of students - sometimes called 'the forgotten half,' a phrase coined 22 years ago by social scientists studying at-risk young people - who, for whatever reason, do not think college is for them." According to USA Today, what is "still getting lost, some argue, is that too many students are going to college not because they want to, but because they think they have to."  Do you think this is true?




Return to Blog


Comments

Read Comments (3)

6/25/2010 4:24 PM by Charles Modiano

It's a good question Maisha. Yes, I think that this is true, but there is really nothing wrong with going to college because you think "you have to". Nobody likes going to the doctor, but we "think we have to". On average, the current and future data projections are pretty clear about the value of college in a increasingly knowledge-based economy. The key is making sure all youth have legitimate options, access, and all the correct information. To be clearer, lets turn it over to ETA's Asst. Secretary Jane Oates and her recent comments while on a Brookings Institution panel on "Transition to Adulthood": "Well, I think the President has been very careful about this. The President has never said everybody is going to go to college. He said that his goal is for everybody to have at least one year of post-secondary education, and I think that’s very different. I think the line we have to draw for at risk youth is that we’re not making that decision for them when they’re 18, that we have to make sure that every kid gets the most options when they leave a program, whether that program is a public high school or whether that program is a second chance program." "We need to make sure that we’re not funneling them incorrectly into a pigeonhole, that we’re, instead, explaining to them their current options and preparing them so that they can take future options. I think in high school reform, it means making sure every kid takes algebra, you know, and it’s – there are simple things like that, but I think in second chance programs, it’s building those bridges that I alluded to that are not limited to community colleges, but community colleges are a natural next step for so many of the kids." Those comments came from page 41, and her full comments can be found here: http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/events/2010/0427_foc/20100427_transition_to_adulthood.pdf


6/30/2010 12:11 PM by Youth Services

With over 90% of jobs requiring education past high school- it is imperative every American recieves a post-secondary education and/or training. In 2009, President Obama stated: "I ask every American to commit to at least one year or more of higher education or career training. This can be a community college or a four-year school, vocational training or an apprenticeship. But whatever the training may be, every American will need to get more than a high school diploma." Again, it does not have to be a four year degree. The US Department of Labor, along with the PTA, discuss various options for post-secondary training and education in the "PTA Goes to Work Guide"-- Check out more options under Resources on our CoP!


6/30/2010 12:11 PM by Youth Services

With over 90% of jobs requiring education past high school- it is imperative every American recieves a post-secondary education and/or training. In 2009, President Obama stated: "I ask every American to commit to at least one year or more of higher education or career training. This can be a community college or a four-year school, vocational training or an apprenticeship. But whatever the training may be, every American will need to get more than a high school diploma." Again, it does not have to be a four year degree. The US Department of Labor, along with the PTA, discuss various options for post-secondary training and education in the "PTA Goes to Work Guide"-- Check out more options under Resources on our CoP!



Post Information

Likes:
Views: 1055
Posted: 6/7/2010 11:31 AM
Posted By: Maisha Meminger
Posted In: Youth Connections
Like Share Print Email